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MULTIMEDIA

MULTIMEDIA > Instruments

Gamma Ray and Neutron Detector
The GRaND
The GRaND instrument is deck-mounted and points towards nadir while acquiring science data
Credit: UCLA
    The GRaND
The GRaND is a Gamma Ray and Neutron Detector spectrometer designed to measure elemental abundances on the surface of Vesta and Ceres
Credit: UCLA
    A cutaway diagram of the GRaND instrument
A cutaway diagram of the GRaND instrument
Credit: UCLA
   
Visible and Infrared Spectrometer
VIR instrument will produce spectral images of Vesta and Ceres
The Visible and Infrared Spectrometer (VIR) instrument will produce spectral images of Vesta and Ceres
Credit: NASA/JPL/INAF/ASI
    VIR instrument produces an image of the spectrum
The VIR instrument produces an image of the spectrum which is colored according to a specified color palette and shown as a line plot or row profile
Credit: NASA/JPL/INAF/ASI
       12/11//07 observation of star Arcturus 12/11//07 observation of star Arcturus
12/11//07 observation of star Arcturus showing visible and infrared measurements by VIR. The strong dip in the visible spectrum at 676.7 nm is not a feature of the star's spectrum, but rather from a filter in the VIR instrument. These spectra have not been calibrated, but are provided here for public interest
Credit: NASA/JPL/INAF/ASI
- JPEG                            - JPEG
This 12/11/07 image of Arcturus
This 12/11/07 image of Arcturus is a composite of measurements at red (734 nm), orange (626 nm), and green (563 nm)
Credit: NASA/JPL/INAF/ASI
    This 12/11/07 image of Arcturus
This 12/11/07 image of Arcturus is from VIR's infrared detector at 1383 nm
Credit: NASA/JPL/INAF/ASI
   
Framing Camera
Ceres
This image of Ceres, Dawn's second destination, was acquired by the Framing Camera during a routine check on July 20, 2010 as it was almost 500 million kilometers (nearly 310 million miles) from Ceres
Credit: NASA/JPL/MPS/DLR/IDA
    The Framing Camera
The Framing Camera is the scientific imaging system of the Dawn Mission
Credit: NASA/JPL/MPS/DLR/IDA
    Flight model of the Framing Camera for the Dawn mission
Flight model of the Framing Camera for the Dawn mission before the last systems test at Max planck Institute for Solar System Exploration
Credit: NASA/JPL/MPS/DLR/IDA
    On the space probe
On the space probe, the camera is completely isolate for thermal reasons
Credit: NASA/JPL/MPS/DLR/IDA
Framing Camera's view of Vega
This movie shows the Framing Camera's view of Vega on December 3 - 4, 2007. Images were taken as the spacecraft slewed the camera's field of view
Credit: NASA/JPL/MPS/DLR/IDA
    Two days after launch, in the Deep Space Network control room
Figure 1: On October 18, 2007, during its first operation in space, Dawn's Framing Camera imaged a star field as part of a set of tests. This figure combines four 30-second exposures
Credit: NASA/JPL/MPS/DLR/IDA
    the spacecraft orientation placed the camera's field of view in the part of the sky shown in this chart
Figure 2: When the FC images used to make Figure 1 were acquired, the spacecraft orientation placed the camera's field of view in the part of the sky shown in this chart, centered at RA = 8h 46m, dec = 24 deg
Credit: NASA/JPL/MPS/DLR/IDA
    High Resolution Stereo Camera Image Composite
Each image on this High Resolution Stereo Camera Image Composite (HRSC) mosaic is of the same location observed by Dawn's Framing Camera when it flew by Mars to complete the spacecraft's gravity assist maneuver on February 17, 2009
Radio Science: Tracking, Communication, and Gravity Science
The 70-meter antenna at the Deep Space Network site in Canberra Australia
The 70-meter antenna at the Deep Space Network site in Canberra Australia
Credit: Gary Emerson
    Two days after launch, in the Deep Space Network control room
Two days after launch, the antenna's tracking schedule of Dawn and other spacecraft on September 29 and 30 is displayed on a wall-sized screen in the Deep Space Network control room
Credit: Gary Emerson
    Dawn baseline interplanetary trajectory for the primary Dawn mission
Dawn baseline interplanetary trajectory for the primary Dawn mission
Credit: JPL