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Dawn Image of the Day / March 2012

   
Unusual bipolar crater
Unusual bipolar crater
March 30, 2012

The roughly 20-kilometer-diameter (12-mile-diameter) crater, named Helena, in the center of this image of Vesta has an interesting bipolar morphology.

Image Credit: NASA/ JPL-Caltech/ UCLA/ MPS/ DLR/ IDA
    Linear and curvilinear grooves
Linear and curvilinear grooves
March 29, 2012

This Dawn framing camera (FC) image of Vesta shows many linear and curvilinear grooves running roughly diagonally across the image.

Image Credit: NASA/ JPL-Caltech/ UCLA/ MPS/ DLR/ IDA
    Dark and bright material in a crater wall
Dark and bright material in a crater wall
March 28, 2012

This Dawn framing camera (FC) image of Vesta shows part of a large crater that has an irregularly shaped, fresh rim.

Image Credit: NASA/ JPL-Caltech/ UCLA/ MPS/ DLR/ IDA
    Large subdued and small fresh craters
Large subdued and small fresh craters
March 27, 2012

This Dawn framing camera (FC) image of Vesta shows many large subdued craters that have smaller, younger craters on top of them.

Image Credit: NASA/ JPL-Caltech/ UCLA/ MPS/ DLR/ IDA
   
           
Lines of craters
Lines of craters
March 26, 2012

This Dawn framing camera (FC) image of Vesta shows lines of craters less than 1 kilometer (0.6 mile) diameter in size, which lie on top of a relatively smooth surface.

Image Credit: NASA/ JPL-Caltech/ UCLA/ MPS/ DLR/ IDA
    Double crater
Double crater
March 23, 2012

sdfsdA double crater, called a crater doublet, is seen in the bottom right part of this framing camera (FC) image of Vesta.

Image Credit: NASA/ JPL-Caltech/ UCLA/ MPS/ DLR/ IDA
    Blocks of ejected material and small craters near a crater rim
Blocks of ejected material and small craters near a crater rim
March 22, 2012

The low sun elevation in this Dawn framing camera (FC) image of Vesta enhances small topographic details near the rim of the large crater, part of which is visible in the bottom left of the image.

Image Credit: NASA/ JPL-Caltech/ UCLA/ MPS/ DLR/ IDA
    Fresh crater inside a rectangular crater
Fresh crater inside a rectangular crater
March 21, 2012

Towards the bottom of this Dawn FC (framing camera) image, slightly offset from the image center, is a small, young, fresh crater within a rectangular, older, heavily eroded crater.

Image Credit: NASA/ JPL-Caltech/ UCLA/ MPS/ DLR/ IDA
   
           
Tarpeia crater
Tarpeia crater
March 20, 2012

This Dawn FC (framing camera) image shows Tarpeia crater. Tarpeia is roughly 30 kilometers (18 miles) in diameter and has a sharp, fresh rim surrounding it.

Image Credit: NASA/ JPL-Caltech/ UCLA/ MPS/ DLR/ IDA
    Apparent brightness and topography images of Tarpeia crater
Apparent brightness and topography images of Tarpeia crater
March 19, 2012

These images are located in Vesta’s Rheasilvia quadrangle, near Vesta’s south pole. NASA’s Dawn spacecraft obtained the apparent brightness image with its framing camera on Oct. 18, 2011.

Image Credit: NASA/ JPL-Caltech/ UCLA/ MPS/ DLR/ IDA
    Severina crater
Severina crater
March 16, 2012

This Dawn FC (framing camera) image shows Severina crater. This is the large crater, approximately 25 kilometers (15 miles) in diameter, visible at the top of the image.

Image Credit: NASA/ JPL-Caltech/ UCLA/ MPS/ DLR/ IDA
    Apparent brightness and topography images of Severina crater
Apparent brightness and topography images of Severina crater
March 15, 2012

The left-hand image is a Dawn FC (framing camera) image, which shows the apparent brightness of Vesta’s surface.

Image Credit: NASA/ JPL-Caltech/ UCLA/ MPS/ DLR/ IDA
   
           
Calpurnia and Minucia craters
Calpurnia and Minucia craters
March 14, 2012

This Dawn framing camera image shows a close up image of two of the craters that make up the three ‘Snowman’ craters: Calpurnia, the larger crater in the bottom of the image, and Minucia, the smaller crater in the top of the image.

Image Credit: NASA/ JPL-Caltech/ UCLA/ MPS/ DLR/ IDA
    Apparent brightness and topography images of Calpurnia and Minucia
Apparent brightness and topography images of Calpurnia and Minucia
March 13, 2012

The left-hand image is a Dawn FC (framing camera) image, which shows the apparent brightness of Vesta’s surface.

Image Credit: NASA/ JPL-Caltech/ UCLA/ MPS/ DLR/ IDA
    Vibidia crater
Vibidia crater
March 12, 2012

This Dawn FC (framing camera) image is centered on Vibidia crater, which is roughly 10 kilometers (6 miles) in diameter. There is a distinctive distribution of bright and dark material around Vibidia crater.

Image Credit: NASA/ JPL-Caltech/ UCLA/ MPS/ DLR/ IDA
    Apparent brightness and topography images of Vibidia crater
Apparent brightness and topography images of Vibidia crater
March 9, 2012

The left-hand image is a Dawn FC (framing camera) image, which shows the apparent brightness of Vesta’s surface.

Image Credit: NASA/ JPL-Caltech/ UCLA/ MPS/ DLR/ IDA
   
           
3-D image of fresh craters
3-D image of fresh craters
March 8, 2012

This 3-D image, called an anaglyph, shows three fresh craters, which have been nicknamed the ‘Snowman’ craters.

Image Credit: NASA/ JPL-Caltech/ UCLA/ MPS/ DLR/ IDA
    3-D image of partially degraded craters
3-D image of partially degraded craters
March 7, 2012

This 3-D image, called an anaglyph, shows partially degraded craters and ridges. To create this anaglyph, two differently colored images are superimposed with an offset to create depth.

Image Credit: NASA/ JPL-Caltech/ UCLA/ MPS/ DLR/ IDA
    3-D image of degraded craters
3-D image of degraded craters
March 6, 2012

This 3-D image, called an anaglyph, shows degraded craters in Vesta’s northern hemisphere. To create this anaglyph two differently colored images are superimposed with an offset to create depth.

Image Credit: NASA/ JPL-Caltech/ UCLA/ MPS/ DLR/ IDA
    3D image of Caparronia
3D image of Caparronia
March 5, 2012

This 3D image, called an anaglyph, shows Caparronia crater, after which Caparronia quadrangle is named. To create this anaglyph two differently colored images are superimposed with an offset to create depth.

Image Credit: NASA/ JPL-Caltech/ UCLA/ MPS/ DLR/ IDA
   
           
Sharp crater rim with dark material and boulders
Sharp crater rim with dark material and boulders
March 2, 2012

This Dawn FC (framing camera) image shows part of the sharp, fresh rim of a large crater in the top part of the image.

Image Credit: NASA/ JPL-Caltech/ UCLA/ MPS/ DLR/ IDA
    Impact crater with smoothed rim
Impact crater with smoothed rim
March 1, 2012

This Dawn FC (framing camera) image shows a large impact crater whose rim is rather smoothed and degraded.

Image Credit: NASA/ JPL-Caltech/ UCLA/ MPS/ DLR/ IDA